german_culture berlin_germany

english french spanish chinese


Home
Architecture
Art
Beauty/Health
Beer
Business/Economy
Cars
Celebrities
Christmas
Dictionaries
Education
Fashion/Clothes
Food
Galleries
Gays/Lesbians
Genealogy
German Names
Germans Abroad
History
Holidays
Homework Help
Learn German
Law
Literature
Loveparade

Movies
Music
Nazi
News
Oktoberfest

Philosophy
Today in History
Traditions
Travel to Germany
Wines

More topics...

Facts About Germany
Armed Forces
Education
Economy
History
Geography
Mass Media
Politics
Society

German History
Early History
Medieval History
Thirty Years' War
Weimar Republic
Third Reich
Postwar
Honecker Era
Berlin Wall
Bismarck

German Recipes
Salads
Main Dishes
Desserts
Baking
German Chocolate Cake
Easter Dishes
Halloween Dishes
Christmas Dishes

How To in Germany
Articles
Quizzes

 

A Glimpse from the Past: Native German Clothing (Dirndl and Tracht)

Each country has its own set of cultural values making it special: language, cuisine, traditions, etc. Dress is also a national peculiarity. Speaking of Germany, Dirndl dress and Lederhosen are the typical pieces of clothes. 

 

Until the 16th century, farmers and people of the lower classes used to wear gray or brown-colored garments. No other colors were worn at that time except for the blue. Blue-colored clothes were allowed only on Sundays and holidays. Since the 16th century, two types of traditional country dress developed: work clothes and Sunday/festive dress. The best examples of these styles are native dress (Tracht) and folk-style dress (Dirndl). There are certain differences between them. Here they are:

  Tracht Dirndl
Means of production sewn and fitted individually by specialized tailors produced by the ready-to-wear fashion industry or made at home
Material only natural materials are used: wool, linen, silk, silver, mother-of-pearl synthetic and plastic products
Decorations handwork: embroidery, lace and hand-woven materials machine embroidery and laces
Meaning indicates the marital status and the clanship of the wearer doesn't indicate any status
Use of ornament careful use of trimmings, focus on quality abundant use of ornamentation, little focus on quality
Length always the same, never changes depends on the current fashion
Body accentuation plays down the female body accentuates the upper part of the female body
Design limited to the traditional form for a given region no limits - the designer's fantasy is all that matters
Prevalence is a rarity stored and exhibited in museums widely spread by the ready-to-wear industry

By the middle of the 19th century, when the industrial revolution took place, the native dress with its specific means of production and only natural materials began to disappear. Instead, the factory-made fabrics entered the life and conquered the market of clothes due to its reasonable price. In the end of the 19th century, native dress came back to life with a new wave of popularity and national consciousness. Native dress was the main symbol of ethnic identity, and folk tradition movements made it their target to revive the national clothing and save it from total disappearing. For that "Volkstrachtenvereine" - "Native Dress Societies" - were created and quickly spread. As a result, thousands of different costumes have been preserved or rescued from oblivion.

Nowadays dirndls are quite popular in Germany and Austria because they are pretty, fun, and not expensive as the native dress! 

Related links:

Bavarian Tracht
Here is a complete listing of traditional Bavarian dress for men and women.

History of Costume
Trace the history of German costume from the stone age till the 16th century.

Middle European Folk Jewelry
The art of dress decoration from German/Austrian region, from About.

 

   
 
   

Like us on Facebook!

 
Advertising. Copyright © Tatyana Gordeeva 1998-2012 Contact. Privacy Policy. Site Map
Powered by Website design company Alex-Designs.com