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Victory and Glory of Baron von Steuben

On June 28, 1778, Von Steuben's training was put to test when the American troops encountered the British Army near Monmouth Courthouse in the town of Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey. What would earlier threaten to become a disastrous defeat for the Colonial forces, was turned into a glorious victory by General von Steuben. The retreating troops of General Lee were brought to a halt by Steuben and reformed under heavy fire. The retreating men knew how to conduct themselves and wheeled into a line with the precision of veterans. What seemed to be a certain defeat turned into a patriot victory and a turning point in the war. This battle was followed by victories in Stony Point, Yorktown and other places. 

In 1784, von Steuben was discharged and granted American citizenship. Baron was very welcome in the most prominent American families of that time - he was a witty, amusing and experienced warrior. However, he never got married and had no children. he died in late November of 1794.

Steubenville

America has glorified its hero - there is a town named Steubenville, and every third Saturday of September the German-American Steuben Parade takes place in New York. The cornflower is the symbol of the parade, selected for its color - blue - signifying the true spirit of German-Americans. This is a well organized annual event, which actually begins on Friday with the welcome words of the mayor of New York and the great banquet. The main parade starts on Saturday at 12 p.m. at the intersection of 63rd and 5th Ave. It progresses along 5th Avenue, pausing at the reviewing stand on 69th and 5th, until reaching its destination on 86th Street. The parade is usually ruled by Miss German-America, or "The Cornflower Queen", and the Princesses are actually ambassadors of the parade. The young ladies are chosen to their positions due to their German-American activities, knowledge of German culture and ability to interact with people. 

On Sunday the parade is concluded with festivals at various German-American clubs.

Previous pages > The Revolutionary General von Steuben > Establishing of Order in the American Army

Related links:

German-American Day: Tercentenary History of Friendship
History and celebration of German-American Day in the United States.

 

   
 
 

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